Engineers repurpose wasp venom as an antibiotic drug

Venomous animals are widely spread all over the globe. Several terrestrial vertebrates (reptiles, birds, insects, and mammals) are also venomous. Major arthropods (scorpions, bees, and wasps) have multicellular glands attached to the stinging apparatus. Bee venom obtained from stepwise fractionation has been reported to contain peptides (Prasasty et al, 2018). It has been known for many years that venom of insects like wasps and bees have compounds that can fight bacteria. Along with that, however, for many humans, these same insect venoms cause toxic reactions so without some kind of refinement was needed. researchers at MIT took the toxin from a South American wasp and created variants of the peptide that are potents against bacterial while nontoxic to human cells. As part of their immune defenses, many organisms produce peptides that can kill bacteria. To help fight the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, many scientists have been trying to adapt these peptides as potential drugs. The study found

Engineers repurpose wasp venom as an antibiotic drug

The venom of insects such as wasps and bees is full of compounds that can kill bacteria. Unfortunately, many of these compounds are also toxic for humans, making it impossible to use them as ...

Fri 7 Dec 18 from Phys.org

Engineers repurpose wasp venom as an antibiotic drug, Fri 7 Dec 18 from ScienceDaily

Scientists Turn Wasp Venom Into Potentially Groundbreaking Antibiotic

There are plenty of chemicals that will kill bacteria, but many of them are toxic to humans as well. That's the case with many compounds in wasp venom, but a team from MIT has managed to tweak ...

Mon 10 Dec 18 from Extremetech

Researchers repurpose wasp venom peptides as antibiotics

Finally, a use for wasps.

Mon 10 Dec 18 from ZME Science

Toxic wasp venom could help protect humans against superbugs

Researchers at MIT studying the antimicrobial properties of a toxin normally found in a South American wasp created variants that are potent against bacteria but nontoxic to human cells.

Fri 7 Dec 18 from Daily Mail

Wasp and Bee venom to fight antibiotic resistant organisms

Venomous animals are widely spread all over the globe. Several terrestrial vertebrates (reptiles, birds, insects, and mammals) are also venomous. Major arthropods (scorpions, bees, and wasps) ...

Thu 13 Dec 18 from Emaxhealth

Engineers Repurpose Wasp Venom as Antibiotic Drug

NewsResearchers have now created variants of a peptide harmful to humans that are potent against bacteria and nontoxic to human cells.Contributed Author: Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyTopics: Bioscience ...

Mon 10 Dec 18 from Laboratory Equipment

MIT engineers repurpose wasp venom as an antibiotic drug

MIT engineers have repurposed wasp venom as an antibiotic drug that's nontoxic to human cells.

Fri 7 Dec 18 from Eurekalert

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