Ultra-fast communication allows aquatic cells to release toxins in unison, researchers find

Crouching in the boot-sucking mud of the Baylands Nature Preserve in Palo Alto, Manu Prakash, associate professor of bioengineering at Stanford University, peered through his Foldscope—a $1.75 origami microscope of his own invention—scrutinizing the inhabitants of the marsh's brackish waters. With his eye trained on a large single-cell organism, called Spirostomum, he watched it do something that immediately made it his next research subject.

Cell communication in the blink of an eye

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02069-7The bodies of unicellular organisms called protists can contract extremely fast. Analysis reveals that ...

Wed 10 Jul 19 from Nature News

Collective intercellular communication through ultra-fast hydrodynamic trigger waves

Nature, Published online: 10 July 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1387-9Ultra-fast hydrodynamic communication between cells emerges in colonies of Spirostomum ambiguum through ...

Wed 10 Jul 19 from Nature News

Cells synchronize to release toxins in unison

Observations of cellular life in a local marsh lead researchers to the discovery of a new type of intercellular communication.

Wed 10 Jul 19 from ScienceDaily

Cells synchronize to release toxins in unison, Wed 10 Jul 19 from Eurekalert

  • Pages: 1

Total number of sources: 5

Bookmark

Bookmark and Share