Molecular scale transporter with a twist, powered by liquid crystal defects

Defects that break the symmetry of otherwise orderly material are called topological defects. In solid crystals, they are called dislocations because they interrupt the regularly structured atom lattice. In contrast, topological defects called disclinations take the form of loops in liquid crystal of the nematic variety, whose elongated molecules look like a shoal of fish. New experiments supported by a theoretical model show how defects forming loops around twisted plastic fibres dipped in liquid crystal could be used for the transport of biochemical substances, when controlled by electric and magnetic fields.

Molecular scale transporter with a twist, powered by liquid crystal defects

Defects that break the symmetry of otherwise orderly material are called topological defects. In solid crystals, they are called dislocations because they interrupt the regularly structured ...

Mon 20 Mar 17 from Phys.org

Molecular scale transporter with a twist, powered by liquid crystal defects, Mon 20 Mar 17 from ScienceDaily

Molecular scale transporter with a twist, powered by liquid crystal defects, Mon 20 Mar 17 from Eurekalert

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