Scientists probe the limits of ice

How small is the smallest possible particle of ice? It's not a snowflake, measuring at a whopping fraction of an inch. According to new research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the smallest nanodroplet of water in which ice can form is only as big as 90 water molecules—a tenth the size of the smallest virus. At those small scales, according to University of Utah chemistry professor and study co-author Valeria Molinero, the transition between ice and water gets a little frizzy.

Scientists probe the limits of ice

How small is the smallest possible particle of ice? It's not a snowflake, measuring at a whopping fraction of an inch. According to new research published in Proceedings of the National Academy ...

Tue 5 Nov 19 from Phys.org

Scientists probe the limits of ice, Tue 5 Nov 19 from Eurekalert

Tiny water droplets reveal minimum number of molecules to make ice

Ice as we know it ceases to exist in droplets that fall below this threshold

Mon 11 Nov 19 from Chemistry World

Scientists find the smallest number of water molecules that can form ice

Experiments and simulations clarify how freezing happens in nanosized droplets

Thu 7 Nov 19 from CandEN

  • Pages: 1

Total number of sources: 4

Bookmark

Bookmark and Share