A Final Answer on How High-Temperature Superconductors Don't Work?

Copper oxide-based superconductors were discovered in 1986. Known as cuprate or high-Tc (for "high critical temperature") superconductors, these materials have a much higher temperature for the transition to zero resistance. But they have proven challenging to explain, since they don't behave as conventional superconductors do. While cuprate superconductors seem to conduct current via paired electrons like conventional superconductors, 26 years later, we still don't know how those pairs are formed. A new optical examination of a bismuth-based cuprate superconductor has demonstrated that electronic excitations may be the primary driver of the superconducting transition. As described by S. Dal Conte et al. in a new Science paper, the complex interactions between electrons give rise to special quasiparticles. These are states that act as a kind of "glue" between electrons, allowing them to form the pairs that carry the superconducting current. The quasiparticle excitations are sufficient to explain th

A Final Answer on How High-Temperature Superconductors Don't Work?

Data rule out mechanism similar to one in ordinary superconductors, team claims

Thu 29 Mar 12 from Science Now

Ultrafast laser pulses shed light on elusive superconducting mechanism

An international team that includes University of British Columbia physicists has used ultra-fast laser pulses to identify the microscopic interactions that drive high-temperature superconductivity.

Thu 29 Mar 12 from Phys.org

Ultrafast laser pulses shed light on elusive superconducting mechanism, Thu 29 Mar 12 from ScienceDaily

Electrons may be the glue in cuprate superconductors

Copper oxide-based superconductors were discovered in 1986. Known as cuprate or high-Tc (for "high critical temperature") superconductors, these materials have a much higher temperature ...

Thu 29 Mar 12 from Ars Technica

Ultrafast laser pulses shed light on elusive superconducting mechanism: U of British Columbia

An international team that includes UBC physicists has used ultra-fast laser pulses to identify the microscopic interactions that drive high-temperature superconductivity. read more

Thu 29 Mar 12 from e! Science News

Ultrafast laser pulses shed light on elusive superconducting mechanism: U of British Columbia, Thu 29 Mar 12 from Eurekalert

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