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A new super-heavy element, temporarily called 117, may soon be making its way into the periodic table after being successfully created in a laboratory setting. Made up of 117 protons, the element matches some of the heaviest atoms ever observed and is around 40 per cent heavier than a single atom of lead... Continue Reading New element is 40 times heavier than leadSection: ScienceTags: Atoms, Physics, Weight Related Articles: Scientists discover new superheavy element 117 Discovery of element 113 confirmed nine years after first detection The Periodic Coffee Table Scientists capture the shadow cast by a single atom Nanotech breakthrough promises single-atom data storage and molecular computers World's smallest magnetic data storage unit created

Superheavy element 117 weighs in again

New isotope "lawrencium-266" also detected

Fri 9 May 14 from Physics World

Element 117 hints at 'island of stability' on periodic table

One of the largest atomic nuclei known could lead to the discovery of superheavy elements that do not immediately decay.

Thu 8 May 14 from Nature News

The periodic table is set to get a new addition - say hello to the superheavy element ununseptium

The periodic table of elements is one step closer to welcoming a new addition to its ranks after scientists independently confirmed the existence of the highly radioactive 117th element.

Tue 6 May 14 from The Independent

Elusive element 117 now closer to periodic table glory

A German lab has become the second collaboration ever to glimpse element 117, strengthening its case for official recognition in the periodic table

Fri 2 May 14 from Newscientist

New element is 40 times heavier than lead

A new super-heavy element, temporarily called 117, may soon be making its way into the periodic table after being successfully created in a laboratory setting. Made up of 117 protons, the element ...

Fri 2 May 14 from Gizmag

Element 117 earns spot on periodic table

Atoms jam-packed with 117 protons have been produced at a particle collider in Germany, confirming the discovery of a new element.

Fri 2 May 14 from ScienceNews

Superheavy element 117 confirmed

Fri 2 May 14 from Phys.org

Physicists add another element to table

IT'S SUPERHEAVY: A new superheavy element looks set to be added to the periodic table with the help of Australian researchers.

Thu 1 May 14 from ABC Science

Total number of sources: 60

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