Electrostatics do the trick: A simple model describes what happens between organic semiconductors and metals

Organic semiconductors allow for flexible displays (OLEDs), solar cells (OPVCs), and other interesting applications. One common problem in these devices, however, is the interface between the metallic contacts and the organic semiconductor material, where undesirable losses occur. Now Dr. Martin Oehzelt has shown what these losses between the metal and the organic semiconductors depend upon and how to minimize them. In particular, his model also explains why a thin, electrically insulating layer between the two materials can even facilitate the transition of charge carriers. His results have recently been published in Nature Communications.

Electrostatics do the trick: A simple model describes what happens between organic semiconductors and metals

Organic semiconductors allow for flexible displays (OLEDs), solar cells (OPVCs), and other interesting applications. One common problem in these devices, however, is the interface between the ...

Mon 23 Jun 14 from Phys.org

Ultra-Thin Dielectric Layer Facilitates Charge Carrier Extraction from Organic Semiconductors into Metal Contacts, Tue 24 Jun 14 from AZoNano

Electrostatics do the trick

Organic semiconductors allow for flexible displays, solar cells, and other applications. One common problem in these devices, however, is the interface between the metallic contacts and the ...

Mon 23 Jun 14 from Eurekalert

Energy-level alignment at metal/organic interfaces: Tying up the loose ends

Organic semiconductors have tremendous potential for complementing conventional, inorganic semiconductors as active materials in (opto-)electronic devices such as light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) ...

Thu 19 Jun 14 from R&D Mag

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