"Aerophilic" surface minimizes foam by absorbing bubbles

In many industrial processes, such as in bioreactors that produce fuels or pharmaceuticals, foam can get in the way. Frothy bubbles can take up a lot of space, limiting the volume available for making the product and sometimes gumming up pipes and valves or damaging living cells. Companies spend an estimated $3 billion a year on chemical additives called defoamers, but these can affect the purity of the product and may require extra processing steps for their removal.

"Aerophilic" surface minimizes foam by absorbing bubbles

Although some people may like a good frothy head on their beer, the foaming of liquids is considered problematic in many fields. A new MIT-designed material could help, as it keeps such foam ...

Thu 13 Feb 20 from Gizmag

Bubble-capturing surface helps get rid of foam

In many industrial processes, such as in bioreactors that produce fuels or pharmaceuticals, foam can get in the way. Frothy bubbles can take up a lot of space, limiting the volume available ...

Wed 12 Feb 20 from Phys.org

Bubble-capturing surface helps get rid of foam, Wed 12 Feb 20 from ScienceDaily

Bubble-capturing surface helps get rid of foam, Wed 12 Feb 20 from Eurekalert

Bubble-capturing surface helps get rid of foam, Wed 12 Feb 20 from Science Blog

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