Shifting dimensions: Exciting excitons in phosphorene

Since its discovery in 2014, phosphorene—a sheet of phosphorus atoms only a single atom thick—has intrigued scientists due to its unique optoelectronic anisotropy. In other words, electrons interact with light and move in one direction only. This anisotropy means that despite being two dimensional (2-D), phosphorene shows a mix of properties found in both one-dimensional (1-D) and 2-D materials. Scientists believe that the distinct quasi-1-D nature of phosphorene could be exploited to develop new, innovative optoelectronic devices, from LEDs to solar cells.

New mechanism of optical gain in two-dimensional material requires only extremely low input power

Optical gain is a prerequisite for signal amplification in an optical amplifier or laser. It typically requires high levels of current injection in conventional semiconductors. By exploring ...

Fri 20 Mar 20 from Phys.org

New mechanism of optical gain in two-dimensional material requires only extremely low input power, Fri 20 Mar 20 from Eurekalert

Shifting dimensions: Exciting excitons in unusual 2D material

Scientists have explored how an excited state of matter -- excitons -- behaves in phosphorene, a two-dimensional material that could be used in LEDs, solar cells, and other optoelectronic devices. ...

Wed 25 Mar 20 from ScienceDaily

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